WORDS TO “WORK” BY

Many of us have our “go to” quotes, phrases or sayings that inspire or compel us to forge ahead when times get tough.
 
I have a few:
 
Winners are made of failures that didn’t quit.
 
I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.
 
Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate; our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure.
 
And the list goes on.
 
These are the words that empower, uplift and motivate us to greatness. The words we live by, values that guide us; especially during those rough patches when a few inspirational words is all we have to hold on to!
 
So does the same apply in business? Should we have words to hold on to that guide our performance in the workplace, particularly when times are tough? ABSOLUTELEY!
 
Ask any of my former employees and they’ll tell you about the “Rules of Paineville”. Long before The Painefree Group, I was notorious for posting my “rules of engagement”, a list of “rules” that represented how I approached my work and what I expected from my team members.
 
I can see the sign now, “Enter at your own risk!”
 
Sounds annoying, I know, but it was a pretty effective tool for creating the kind of work culture that I longed for, and when times were tough for me, I could rely on my teammates to remind me of my own principles!
 
My list usually looked something like this:

  1. Failure is not an option.
  2. Can’t is the original four-letter word.
  3. Quality is not what you say, its what you do, and what you did according to the client.
  4. The customer may not always be right, but superior service is never negotiable, and above all,
  5. PLEASE, don’t make promises you can’t keep

As the old saying goes, he who stands for nothing will fall for anything. Having your own list of standards to guide how you wish to perform at work and consequently, how others perform around you can be so helpful in shaping your end result.
 
So let’s hear it, what are YOUR rules to work by?  We’d love to hear them!
 

By | 2018-01-31T13:58:10-05:00 November 12th, 2012|Career Management|Comments Off on WORDS TO “WORK” BY